Lifestyle – HTV https://htv.com.pk Fri, 21 Jun 2019 17:54:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://htv.com.pk/wp-content/uploads/cropped-iphone-retina-1-32x32.png Lifestyle – HTV https://htv.com.pk 32 32 Here Is How Your Playlist Is Benefiting You https://htv.com.pk/lifestyle/music-playlist-is-benefiting-you Fri, 21 Jun 2019 14:53:13 +0000 https://htv.com.pk/?p=45077

Are you someone who cannot work without music on? No matter what your playlist is, you need to listen to it on repeat for that creativity to flow? Well then fret not, you are one of many individuals in the world who think music helps with your performance. We legit wrote this article with our […]

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Are you someone who cannot work without music on? No matter what your playlist is, you need to listen to it on repeat for that creativity to flow?

Well then fret not, you are one of many individuals in the world who think music helps with your performance.

We legit wrote this article with our earphones plugged in.

But other than work, here is a list of things music helps with:

Learning notes with the right notes

A lot of students study while listening to music and the good news is science approves. According to different studies carried out in the 90s, students who listened to Mozart’s classical music are smarter. This was popularly known as the Mozart Effect.

Related: Music Eases Pain After Surgery: Study

In fact, they studies also claimed that music helps one visualize better, which is why a significant number of teachers and mothers play not only Mozart’s music but other classical music during study period to help kids with their learning.

Sooth your anxiety with music

While different music makes one experience different emotions, according to a recent survey it has been noted that listening to rap music helps one feel less anxious.

Yes, we know rap isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. But hey, it doesn’t hurt to try. You might just Stan a rap artist.

Related: Music To Boost Your Happy Mode On!

Music for the brain

We all have a set playlist that we listen to when we workout. It helps us focus and workout better. But did you know that just listening to music is exercise for your brain? Yes, you read that right.

We have heard a number of people telling us to exercise to stay fit but just as much as our body needs a good workout session, so does our brain. After all, it’s been doing all the work with us all day, every day.

So, plug in your earphones and listen to the music you like and if anyone asks why you are just sitting idle and listening to music, just tell them you are exercising.

How do you think music helps you? Let us know in the comments below.

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Blackmailing: Being Fearless In The Face Of Fearsome https://htv.com.pk/lifestyle/blackmailing Fri, 21 Jun 2019 07:45:16 +0000 https://htv.com.pk/?p=45053

Since the beginning of their lives, women are always taught to be careful about every single action they perform, from what they speak to what they share, especially with whom. They are always told not to trust anyone, especially with their pictures. There are many women out there who get blackmailed and harassed by men […]

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Since the beginning of their lives, women are always taught to be careful about every single action they perform, from what they speak to what they share, especially with whom. They are always told not to trust anyone, especially with their pictures. There are many women out there who get blackmailed and harassed by men if they come across their photos, private or otherwise.

Sarwat* was in grade 10 when she got blackmailed by a classmate who groped her during an evacuation drill at their school.

“He found out that I had a boyfriend. He managed to take unsolicited pictures of me, and he knew that getting a call from a male classmate could land me into trouble. So, he spread those pictures and I started getting calls from different numbers. I had to change my number so many times,” she said.

Sarwat said that she only had one male friend who would support her and ask her to not pick up calls, because she was traumatized as to how many social media platforms had the picture.

“I felt isolated because many of my friends who were girls wouldn’t engage because they too belonged to conservative backgrounds. My siblings were younger and I could not tell my mother,” she recalls.

No matter whom Sarwat told, she believed it was always her fault. Even at the age of just 14, Sarwat knew that telling others, especially elders wouldn’t be of any use. “Recently, the same guy contacted me and I had a breakdown because I was so scared,” she said.

Sarwat added that she did want to report but didn’t know where to and thinks that girls who are 13 or 16 need to be taught that there are mediums for help because there is no sense of awareness there.

Related: The Anam Tanoli Case: A Reminder That Cyberbullying Is On The Rise

Alvina*, who also came across a similar incident during her university days said that a classmate with whom she had a casual relationship started blackmailing her. He said that he would send screenshot of her conversations and pictures to the man she was getting married to.

“I lodged a complaint against him in the FIA, and they asked me to visit their office so action may be taken against him. I told him about it and said that if he tries to harm me in any way, I won’t remain silent and that scared him enough that he stopped.  I’ve been married for two years now, and it has been almost three years to this incident,” she said.

But unlike other women, Alvina had confided in her husband who supported her, but she didn’t tell her family because she was scared. But she didn’t let the guy see that. From her past experiences she had learnt that getting scared always give men a power boost.

“Men thrive on women’s fear, the day they realize you aren’t scared of them is when they don’t have anything against you,” she says.

She also felt that while she knew of the law, many women do not. However, Alvina also thinks that women do not tell because they are afraid that their partners would leave. And even if they do forgive them at that time, they keep throwing it in their face whenever they get a chance, so there is a risk involved, she explains.

Why women don’t report blackmailing?

Shmyla Khan of Digital Rights Foundation, an organization which works on cybercrimes and aims to create safer online spaces for women and other marginalized groups, believes that many women do not report cases because of a general distrust of law enforcement agencies:

“This is also because blackmailing cases require women to provide proof, i.e. copies of the material being used to blackmail. Furthermore, women are scared their families might find out if they report a case. I’ve also noticed a lot of women end up blaming themselves, especially in relationships which were previously consensual.”

Given that the organization often comes across such cases, Shmyla feels that there is a lack of awareness even within the FIA and judges regarding the gender dynamics that come with blackmailing: “Gender sensitivity training is a start. While awareness and education program work, their success is contingent on tackling larger notions of women’s sexuality and victim blaming.”

So, what can be done to make sure that blackmailing can be countered?

Shmyla said that the Section 21 of the Prevention of Electronic Crimes Act covers blackmailing and use of sexually explicit content without consent. Furthermore, distribution of any video or picture is criminalized under Section 24 of the Act.

Blackmailing is not a new concept and people have used various methods to coerce people who are marginalized because it is mainly about power, and there aren’t any fixed ways to make sure that there can be an end to this.

However, there are definitely many ways to make sure that the victim doesn’t fall in the mesh of self-blame, low self-esteem and isolation.

For instance, if someone, regardless of their gender confides, believe them instead of blaming them because it takes a lot of courage to be able to say it aloud that a person is being blackmailed. Support systems are also helpful because the victim needs to understand that they are not alone, and it is not their fault that the other person broke their trust.

The DRF has a toll-free helpline for such cases, 0800-39393. But remember the FIA takes time to process cases so don’t expect immediate results and it would be difficult but just don’t feel scared and give in to the pressure, because as Alvina had said the perpetrator thrives on fear.

*Names have been changed to protect privacy

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Hijaab: What’s In The Head VS What’s On The Head https://htv.com.pk/lifestyle/hijaab-whats-in-the-head Fri, 14 Jun 2019 12:17:36 +0000 https://htv.com.pk/?p=44971

Three years ago, a viral trend under the hashtag #TraditionallySubmissive was seen across Twitter and other social media platforms with Muslim women holding placards, after the then Prime Minister, David Cameron had shared his views demeaning Muslim women in a private conversation. Listing their achievements, Muslim women had taken to social media to prove that […]

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Three years ago, a viral trend under the hashtag #TraditionallySubmissive was seen across Twitter and other social media platforms with Muslim women holding placards, after the then Prime Minister, David Cameron had shared his views demeaning Muslim women in a private conversation.

Listing their achievements, Muslim women had taken to social media to prove that they were more than the hijaab they work or the values they adhered to.

While these movements are a response to the rising alt-right sentiment, here in Pakistan, Hijaabis are also trying to make a mark for themselves by proving that there is more to their lives than the garment on their head.

As someone who donned the hijaab for a decade and out of her own will, I feel that the relationship with the hijaab is a complex one and cannot be seen in black and white, especially in a country like Pakistan where one (large) section of the society approves it and the other section shames women who step out in hijaab.

It must also be seen that brands do not cater to women who wear hijaab rather only recently, some of them started including them in their campaigns, and perhaps the reason behind it would be the idea that a hijaabi is a person who can only speak about beliefs and religion, and not lifestyle or fashion.

As mentioned earlier that hijaab cannot be viewed in a vacuum. Both views regarding the act of wearing also need to be connected to the woman’s agency over her body rather than simply putting it under two labels of oppression and empowerment, because it can fall under either according to the context and placement of the person wrapping or unwrapping the garment around their body.

In fact, the trend was challenging the stereotype surrounding the hijaab and showed how there is constant conversation about women with an ease of categorizing them into different boxes. This is important to understand because if a woman covering her head is trying to make a point, it would either be taken too seriously or would be disregarded completely under the idea that such women cannot think beyond the garment on their head. A thought which needs to be revised thoroughly.

Inclusivity or tokenism?

It is also thought that some brands take a hijaabi model in their commercial to show that they are inclusive. However, bloggers feel that it is a step in the right direction because some visibility is better than none.

Blogger, Tahleel Khan, currently pursuing her education in medical, is a makeup artist and blogs about fashion and lifestyle hasn’t felt that the hijaabi women taken for campaigns are a ‘token representation’, and that she is given enough space alongside non-hijaabi women, in her own personal experience.

“I do not support the idea of stereotypes, be it for any group, and yes hijaabis are stereotyped but that has more to do with toxic societal norms than anything else. There is no doubt that there is a lot of pressure on hijaabi influencers with regards to their commentary of religion but majority of the hijaabi bloggers I follow, talk about fashion, lifestyle and makeup and they do not feel the need to drag in faith like it’s their responsibility,” she said.

Speaking about the attitude of brands and campaigns she said that she felt that they do offer a good window.

“I think it’s a step in the right direction because there is hardly any representation of women who cover their head. I won’t say I am glad with the bare minimum but I won’t dismiss the efforts which are being done,” she said.

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Tahleel also lamented that underrepresentation of groups can be seen by who walks on the runway.

“Just like a black/transgender character should be played by a black/transgender person, a person who does not cover her head should not do so for a brand because a hijaabi is out there who can do the same. There are entire groups of women who wear dupatta on their heads yet we would hardly see brands catering to them, and it seems that they do not focus on their homes,” she pointed out.

She felt that this attitude was not restricted to Hijaabi women only rather any woman, who was not skinny, with long hair and fair-skinned and having unattainable features would be chosen instead of those who do not fit the bill, hence she appreciates all campaigns which do choose to steer away from the norms.

Wrapping into a stereotype

Blogger Anum Jaffry, who has been in the field for a decade now, said that while she personally did not face any such limitations, she did feel that there is a prevailing mindset that a woman who covers her head would only be devout and religious.

“There is this notion that they cannot talk about other things like fashion, lifestyle and that their views pertaining to faith would be strict, and that they would only speak about hijaab, whilst women have proven time and again that they can perform in tech, travel and many other sectors as well,” Anum said, who has been involved with blogging about tech and now focuses on parenting and social issues.

Speaking about the vitriol received by women who do not cover their heads, Anum agreed that it wasn’t unreal and that it was about the mindset.

“In our society, people would pay heed to a cleric even if he utters things which are unreasonable, and similar angle can be applied to a hijaabi as well that even if a woman covering her head would say something misleading, people would be quick to agree as compared a non-hijaabi saying something beneficial,” she said.

While brands may capitalize on all that they deem fit under inclusivity, at the end, it also comes down to the complex idea of agency of women and how the garment is used in different ways to govern women’s bodies.

For my personal understanding, I always go back to the momentous scene at the English Defence League protest in 2017 when a non-hijaabi woman, Saffiyah Khan came to the rescue of a hijaabi woman, Saira Zafar who was being harassed by the EDL members threatening to harm her, because as it is said, it is more about what is in your head rather what’s on your head.

Saffiyah Khan confronting an English Defence League protestor in 2017

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5 Ways 2019 Ramazan is Better Than the 90s https://htv.com.pk/lifestyle/better-than-the-90s Sat, 01 Jun 2019 10:47:14 +0000 https://htv.com.pk/?p=44848

Ramazan 2019 is about to end. While we are happy that we are going to have our routine back and get into the daily rut of our mundane lives (didn’t sell it well, now did we?), we are also sad to bid goodbye to all the festivities that come with the holy month. Now don’t […]

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Ramazan 2019 is about to end. While we are happy that we are going to have our routine back and get into the daily rut of our mundane lives (didn’t sell it well, now did we?), we are also sad to bid goodbye to all the festivities that come with the holy month.

Now don’t tell us, you are not going to miss roaming out in the wee hours of the night, along with the whole city, and miss those crispy pakoray and rolls. And just like most of our cities have seen much hustle and bustle ever since the security situation in the country has become better, there are a few other things that have become better with age.

Here are five things that make Ramazan 2019 better than the 90s.

Ramazan Are in The Summer

We know, we know, it’s hot and humid, and the sun hasn’t been kind to us. But hear us out. The winter season in most parts of the country gets really cold. Cold enough to keep us house bound, making us miss all the dawats and good food (read: free food).

After all, isn’t Ramazan about eating and dining out?

And can we even drink thandi thandi lassi and mashroob-e-mashriq in the cold without getting a sore throat. So, while we have to fast for longer hours, we fast and feast at a much more ease than we would in the winter.

No More Street Cricket

Back in the days almost every street in the city hosted a cricket match after iftar up until sehri. While for many it was harmless fun, we kid you not it was a lot of inconvenience.

Roads were blocked, streets were noisy and don’t even get us started on how many window glasses were broken. So what if there are fewer recreational activities in the city for children, we want peace.

Now that the street cricket culture has almost died out with fewer localities hosting it, we can watch Jeeto Pakistan in peace.

And for cricket? Just watch the World Cup, why don’t you.

Sehri/Iftar Deals

If Pakistanis are not fasting, they are feasting. And owing to our very own Restaurant Spring along with the increase in purchasing power of our public, we have plenty of options to choose from to eat out. And that too at discounted rates.

We are spoilt for choice and we are not complaining. And all those carbs are just the cherry on the topping. We will just call it holiday weight.

Shop Till We Drop

Barring the first 10 days, malls are open till 3am. Giving us ample time to go for not just a stroll in the mall but also spend time picking out clothes from the many retail outlets that have sprung up over the years.

After all, who wants to do anything else than try on pretty clothes even if we can’t afford them.

Sharing Isn’t Caring

Gone are the days when we were friendly with our neighbors and shared food trays during iftar. Our busy lives and fear of one another have made us less enthusiastic about knowing who resides next door.

And our anti-social selves are happy. No more small talk and nosey neighbors. We can eat what we have made to our heart’s content.

This article is a work of satire.

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Which Pakora Are You According To Your Zodiac Sign? https://htv.com.pk/lifestyle/which-pakora-are-you Wed, 29 May 2019 08:46:13 +0000 https://htv.com.pk/?p=44779

Ramzan is incomplete without the aroma of pakoras wafting through the air at iftar time. It is the one essential item on most iftar tables and let’s be honest, all the ‘healthy’ dawats we attend that skip out on these are a real waste of time. *hint* The thing about these fried besan nuggets is that they’re infinitely […]

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Ramzan is incomplete without the aroma of pakoras wafting through the air at iftar time. It is the one essential item on most iftar tables and let’s be honest, all the ‘healthy’ dawats we attend that skip out on these are a real waste of time. *hint*

The thing about these fried besan nuggets is that they’re infinitely customizable and every household has a different variation that they prefer, much the same as daal chawal. But which type of pakoras, hold in essence, the traits of your zodiac? Let’s find out.

Aries

This star sign is known to be competitive and quick; to want the best of all worlds. There’s no better fit than mixed vegetable pakoras.

PARENTING.FIRSTCRY.COM

Taurus

Always there to depend on, Taureans have strong personalities that act as boulders for others to lean on. Our choice: anday ka pakora.

COOKPAD.COM

Gemini

Versatile is one of the easiest ways to describe a Gemini- kind and expressive are other commonly associated traits. Bread pakora easily exudes the same warmth as a Gemini.

HUNGRYFOREVER.COM

Cancer

The compassionate Cancerian provides comfort and protection much like the indispensable aloo ka pakora.

RECIPEMASTERS.IN

Leo

A fiery personality with a lot of flair, there was no second guessing this one: mirchi ka pakora is the perfect fit.

FOODFOOD.COM

Virgo

Virgos are gentle and practical- some may say just like a palak ka pakora. No nonsense but with all the style.

Libra

As indecisive as Librans are, they are also diplomatic- the people pleasers get to be matched with pyaz ka pakora. Simple, with nothing to complain about.

VEGRECIPES4U.COM

Read: 5 Iftar Items For Sharing in Ramzan

Scorpio

The brave Scorpio goes down the path less wandered with baingan ka pakora as its suited choice.

VERYGOODRECIPES.COM

Sagittarius

Generosity is the name of the game for Sagittarians. They’re friendly and don’t like to skimp on things. A hearty chicken pakora is the best fit.

STYLECRAZE.COM

Capricorn

Ah, the disciplined Capricorn. An independent being who often tends to go their own way. Forget the content of the besan mixture, a Capricorn stands out by changing the method of cooking. He/ she is an ‘air-fried pakora’.

VEGANOPOULOUS.COM

Aquarius

Another original, yet stubborn personality. Tends to be creative and has a fully thriving imagination- what better than a fish ka pakora to suit this star.

I2.WP.COM

Pisces

Wise and empathetic, and beautifully creative- gobi (cauliflower) ka pakora is our pick. The delicious variation often leaves one surprised at how great it turned out.

CRAFTLOG.COM

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