If you are looking for a new yoga exercise, try ‘Lord of the Dance’ position

Team HTV Jul 03 2015
yoga

Yoga can only be effective if it is done right. And for this reason, there are many positions which facilitate efficiency from body to body. My personal favorite, however, is a position called the “lordof the dance” (natarajasana).

This position is unique in the sense that it caters for multiple parts of one’s body and can be very soothing. It focuses on the thighs, limbs, abdomen, shoulder and spine. It also expands the shoulders, chest and thighs of the body and helps rejuvenate the legs and ankles.

It also aids to augment your ability to balance.

You can learn this pose by following a few simple steps.

Step 1 – For your legsca33d9500c29918634295cdcddff9f6a

Stand in the mountain pose, also known as tad asana pose. Breath in, and transfer all your weight on your right foot; now raise your left foot in such a way that your heal approaches your back while bending your left knee. Put some pressure on your right thigh and pull the right knee cap up so as to keep the right leg straight and aligned.

Step 2 – For your arms and hands

There are two alternate ways with which you could handle your arms and hands.

  • Try to keep your body straight up. Reach the outside of your left foot with your left hand while pressing your tailbone towards the floor and at the same time moving your pubis up, towards your navel. Try to move your foot away from your body while dilating your left thigh such that it is running alongside the floor. Once you are done with your left foot and thigh, move your right hand in front of your body, so that it is also parallel to the floor.
  • The other way of going about natarajasana is to grasp your left foot with your right hand by reaching it from behind your back. After taking hold of your left foot expand your left thigh so that it is parallel to the floor. This variation is a bit laborious but enables you to polish your balancing techniques.

 

Step 3 – Overall body

Remain in this position for about half a minute and then release your left foot from your hand. Repeat all the above steps with your right foot, for the same amount of time.

In order to achieve the full natarajasana pose carry out step number one, then move your left hand away from your body, reaching the outer side of your foot such that you bend your elbow. Use two of your fingers to hold the left foot while your thumb rests on the sole of your foot. Align your left thigh such that it is parallel to the floor. Now rotate your left shoulder such that it your elbow points upwards; this would require a little patience and practice because it demands a high level of flexibility.

Now move your right arm in front of your body such that it is parallel to the floor. Remain in this position for about half a minute, then release and repeat all these steps with your right foot.

Benefits of natarajasana:

The natarajasana pose strengthens your chest, hips and legs and helps you in reducing weight. It also improves the posture of your body and balances it. This pose helps in improving your concentration level and makes your digestive system work well. It stretches your abdominal organs, thighs and groin. If you practice natarajasana, you will feel less stressed and your mind will be at peace.

However, this pose is not for everyone. Those who suffer from low blood pressure or have a tendency of developing muscle spasm should not try this position. In fact, if you get a muscle spasm while performing this yoga exercise, you can fix is by bending your elevated ankle.

If you are looking for a new yoga routine, the ‘lord of the dance’ or natarajasana pose is for you.

Team HTV

Team HTV:

HTV is the portal, for trusted health and fitness news, updates, articles and tips. Being committed towards listening to people, and through that we have discovered that, staying healthy is more of a challenge rather than a necessity nowadays. Each and every update, article and tip HTV provides is read, investigated and explored before it is being published.