Your Food Choices Affect Many Things, Including Bad Breath

Faryal Panhwar Jan 13 2015
your-food-choices-affect-many-things-including-bad-breath

Has your friend ever leaned over to whisper something quietly and you found yourself trying hard not to pinch your nose to block out the bad smell? It’s ok. There’s a good chance your breath has smelled horrid many a times as well. It’s no wonder that store shelves are beset with a variety of breath-pleasing products.

The Myth Behind Bad Breath

Myth? There is no myth behind bad breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be embarrassing and in many cases, can also cause anxiety. It is primarily due to careless dental hygiene. However reasons vary from individual to individual. Halitosis can also be a sign of health problems. Your unpleasant breath can become more repulsive as a result of certain eating habits and other unwholesome takes on lifestyle.

How Your Food Choices Affect Bad Breath

Your mouth is the first site for the digestion of food. Whenever you eat, the food is broken down first by the enzymes in your saliva. Enzymes are small proteins which facilitate certain chemical reactions. The food is further digested in the stomach and intestines, then absorbed in the bloodstream, and ultimately given off as your breath after being processed by the lungs. In essence, whatever you eat will be retained in your breath for longer than you may like.

Certain foods, such as onions and garlic, with a specially pungent and repulsive stench, may be the main drivers of your bad breath. Even brushing, flossing and mouthwash may not rid you entirely of the odor. It will only go away until after the food has been processed and removed from the body (through urine or feces).

One tip to remember is: Avoid onions and garlic and any other food which may leave an unpleasant taste and smell in your mouth.

How Does Careless Dental Hygiene Affect Your Breath?

All of those toothpaste commercials which stress over and over on the significance of brushing twice daily, are true to their point. If you’ve been ignoring their advice all this time and looking for ways to get rid of your bad breath, it’s time you pay heed to them.

When you don’t brush regularly, food particles are left behind and stick on your teeth to celebrate and have a blast. The bacteria quietly make their way, settling among the food, and covertly take over your teeth, gums and tongue. While the bacteria have fun around your mouth, they leave a mess behind, and if left unclean it creates that bad breath your friend is subtly trying to not smell.

Additionally, other hazardous habits like smoking or chewing tobacco-based products also change the dynamics of your breath. They also stain your teeth and make them look undesirable.

Health Problems Associated With Bad Breath

If you are faced with the problem of bad breath persistently, then it may hint towards gum disease, or as dentists call it gingivitis. Other associated health issues may include sinus infections, pharyngitis (sore throat), pneumonia, lactose intolerance or other diseases related to the liver and/or kidney.

Another trigger for bad breath could be dry mouth, also known as xerostomia. Saliva is vital to moisten and clean the mouth. Lack of saliva may naturally result in bad breath.

Also, if you have dentures or braces, then failure to properly clean food particles from appliances can further invite the bacteria.

Cure That Bad Breath!

To cure anything, you must know about its cause. Identify your cause and treat it. In most cases, bad breath is successfully treatable. You might find the following helpful

  1. Brush after every meal, floss regularly and use trusted mouthwashes.
  2. Prevent dry mouth with chewing gum or mints (sugar-free). Use Xylitol. Xylitol has shown great anti-cavity properties.
  3. Eat an apple a day. Apparently, an apple a day keeps bad breath away.
  4. To neutralize excess acids found in your oral cavity, brush your teeth with baking soda occasionally.
  5. Drink black and green tea. The polyphenols within them decrease oral bacteria.
  6. Consult your doctor as well as your dentist for any underlying health conditions
Faryal Panhwar

Faryal Panhwar:

Faryal is currently a second year M.B.B.S student at Ziauddin University. She is an active participate in the Model UN where her passion for debate has received her several delegate awards. Seeking to discover the writer in herself Faryal is now working as a freelance writer for HTV.